King's College Department of History

HISTORY 345
MODERN BRITAIN

MR. HOWARD B. FEDRICK
SPRING 2003

OVERVIEW and OBJECTIVES of the COURSE

MODERN BRITAIN

From some of the earliest periods of recorded history there has been a place in those records for the story of Great Britain and its people. Through time the history of the people of the "tight, little island" has been closely interwoven in the story of all nations and peoples. Institutions of government as well as concepts of law and jurisprudence; archetypal forms of literature and classic art, architecture, and music; social conventions as well as scientific principles; industrial advancements and modern technologies as well as socio-economic philosophies - all of these and more are a part of the history and legacy of Great Britain. It is a story of queens and kings, commoners and colonials. It is a story whose geography encompasses Glasgow, Belfast, and London as well as Cardiff and Dover and beyond "the isles" to Boston, Calcutta, and Hong Kong.

Our task is to explore that rich and varied story of Britain from the time of George II to the era of Lady Thatcher and Tony Blair. The examination of political, economic, social, and cultural forces will characterize our analysis and critique. The principal areas of our study: the development of a stable and responsive governmental structure; the establishment of the world's first truly industrial economy; the growth of British empire and world power; the unique character of the Victorian era; the emergence of the welfare state in the 20th century; the end of empire and the chaotic character of the contemporary period.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

TEXTBOOK

William B. Willcox and Walter L. Arnstein, The Age Of Aristocracy, 1688-1830. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath, 2002. Eighth Edition. (referred to below as A of A)
Walter L. Arnstein,Britain Yesterday and Today, 1830 to the Present. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath, 2002. Eighth Edition. (referred to below as BYT)

SUPPLEMENTAL READING ASSIGNMENTS

Various readings will be assigned during the semester to complement the text and lecture. These readings will be distributed in class. They are to be completed PRIOR to discussion of the material in class lectures.

SUPPLEMENTAL INTERNET RESOURCES

To assist in gathering a knowledge and understanding of many issues in the text as well as in classroom discussions and as an adjunct to your own research I have posted a Modern Britain Website which you might wish to access and use as is appropriate. Access: MODERN BRITAIN 1688-2000 (www.kings.edu/hbfedric/britweb.html)

WRITTEN RESEARCH ASSIGNMENTS

Two (2) written research papers will be assigned. Guidelines for each assignment will be distributed as appropriate. Exploration of various research resources including the library and the Internet will be encouraged in the completion of these assignments. Students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in applying the writing and critical thinking developed in CORE 110 and CORE 100. All students will be expected to submit papers in typed or word processed form. Handwritten work will NOT be accepted. Research assignments submitted more than a week after the deadline date without prior approval - highest grade possible "C". Failure to submit any and all work on or before the last class day - automatic grade "F" on the work.

CONTEMPORARY SUBJECTS RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT AND REPORT

After the mid-semester a research assignment will be made on a subject or subjects of contemporary significance. Guidelines will be distributed as appropriate. The nature of the assignment will be a combination of written and oral presentation.

TESTS

There will be three (3) written tests given during the semester including the final examination. The first two tests will be announced in class at least ten (10) days in advance. The third (final) examination will be given according to the Registrar's examination schedule. The tests will be based on the lectures and assigned reading materials. The general structure of the tests will be essay. Each test will be non-comprehensive and will review the most recent materials covered.

CLASSROOM and WEB CT DISCUSSION LIST PARTICIPATION

Regular participation - asking or responding to questions, volunteering one's own ideas or arguments, sharing evidence - is expected from each student. A WEB CT adjunct to this course has been established and student participation is expected in that arena of activity. Participation in class and online will be weighed in the overall semester grade evaluation as a growth/development factor.

ATTENDANCE

You and I are responsible adults. We are expected to attend classroom lectures/discussions on a regular basis. The rules of the College regarding class attendance will be followed strictly. You are responsible for all materials discussed in lectures and classroom discussions. MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE ABSENCE of THREE (3) - excused OR unexcused. Three consecutive absences or a pattern of absence over a three week period will initiate an Excessive Absence Report to the Associate Vice-President for Student Affairs. It is to be correctly assumed that it will be impossible to receive a grade which is higher than the percentage of days attended without significant reasons. Absence on the day of a scheduled test will not be excused unless a serious reason has been explained to me (in advance, if possible) and arrangements for a make-up test are made within five (5) class days of the scheduled test. It is YOUR RESPONSIBILITY to arrange the make-up with me. It should NOT be presumed that absence on a test day or an oral presentation day will automatically permit a re-test.

SEMESTER GRADE EVALUATION

The determination of the final semester grade will be based on the successful completion of all requirements for the course using numerical values as follows:
Tests: Test I, II, III - 60% total (20% each)
Written Research Assignments - 30% total (15% each)
Contemporary Subjects Research Assignment - 10%
The professor's grading scale to be used is as follows:
A+ = 98    A = 95    A- = 92
B+ = 88    B = 85    B- = 82
C+ = 78    C = 75    C- = 72
D+ = 68    D = 65    F = 59

OFFICE CONTACT / OFFICE HOURS

Effective teaching and excellence in learning is often best achieved in a combination of the classroom and outside the classroom. To that end be advised of the following:


COURSE TOPICAL OUTLINE: General Suggested Text Readings (subject to change by instructor)


SECTION I


SECTION II


SECTION III

Howard B. Fedrick

History Department

King's College

Last Updated January 5, 2003